20th December 2013 admin

Solutions to global organ shortage

Organ regeneration
Tissue engineering is a rapidly diversifying technology that emerged as a regenerative or reparative medicine with potential to circumvent organ shortage globally. Extensive developments in tissue engineering, which involve leveraging technologies from biomaterials, molecular medicine, biochemistry, nanotechnology, genetic, and biomedical engineering, target the restructure and/or repair of human organs through regeneration and cell expansion.

In recent years, cell-based technologies and the integration of genetics – with the use of biological substitutes that aim to restore, maintain or enhance tissue function – have been a popular approach for tissue regeneration and reparation treatment, according to Frost & Sullivan’s Advances in Tissue Engineering and Organ Regeneration: Technology Market Penetration and Roadmapping analysis

Tissue engineering has been a field marked by extensive research and development (R&D), and companies take several years to commercially launch products.

Frost & Sullivan Technical Insights Industry Analyst Darshana De, explains:

“Still considered a nascent science, research in the field has offered and continues to offer an increasing number of substitutes for applications that would enable the human body to withstand pain and injuries. Apart from previous applications such as the common regeneration of bone, cartilage and skin, current targets have expanded to cardiovascular, kidney, pancreas, liver, spine, ligament, esophagus, cornea, thoracic, lung, nerve, lymphatic and blood vessels.”

Despite this expanding capability and the technology’s remarkable impact on the healthcare sector, tissue engineers need to overcome many challenges for their field to gain recognition as a mainstream medical technology. For instance, safety and efficacy remain top concerns with several products still undergoing research studies for their validation. Therefore, most patients continue to opt for treatment by medication and the usage of medical devices for temporary relief of symptoms.

Nevertheless, regenerative medicine has immense scope as a disruptive technology, especially as a number of medical device and pharmaceutical companies are conducting R&D through mergers and acquisitions with smaller companies or partnerships with the academic sector.

The convergence of these methodologies and equipment will open up new opportunities for different stakeholders and quicken market penetration.

Source: Frost & Sullivan

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